Flourless Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Mini Blender Muffins

Food & Nutrition, recipes, Uncategorized

Flourless Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Mini Blender Muffins

YIELD: ABOUT 17 MINI MUFFINS

TOTAL TIME:15 MINUTES

PREP TIME:2 MINUTES

COOK TIME:8 TO 9 MINUTES

The fastest and easiest batter I’ve ever made. Combine all ingredients (except the chocolate chips) and blend until smooth. The muffins are gluten-free, grain-free, soy-free, dairy-free, oil-free, refined sugar-free, and they’re under 100 calories each (66 calories if you omit chocolate chips). For all the health claims you could make about these muffins, the best part is that they taste every bit as good as muffins made with flour, gluten, and lots of added sugar. The peanut butter flavor is pronounced and bold, while the banana disappears almost entirely. I used mini chocolate chips because they’re size-appropriate for the mini muffins.

  1. INGREDIENTS:
  2. 1 medium ripe banana, peeled
  3. 1 large egg
  4. heaping 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter (I recommend using classic storebought peanut butter, and not natural or homemade)
  5. 3 tablespoons honey (agave or maple syrup may be substituted)
  6. 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  7. 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  8. pinch salt, optional and to taste
  9. heaping 1/2 cup mini semi-sweet chocolate chips

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 400F. Prepare mini muffin pans by spraying very well with floured cooking spray, or grease and flour the pans; set aside. If keeping gluten-free for health reasons, simply use cooking spray or grease the pan.
  2. To the canister of a blender, add first 7 ingredients, through optional salt, and blend on high speed until smoothy and creamy, about 1 minute.
  3. Add chocolate chips and stir in by hand; don’t use the blender because it will pulverize them.
  4. Using a tablespoon or small cookie scoop that’s been sprayed with cooking spray (helps batter slide off spoon or scoop easily), form rounded 1 tablespoon mounds and place mounds into prepared pans. Each cavity should be filled to a solid 3/4 full.
  5. Bake for 8 to 9 minutes, or until the tops are set, domed, springy to the touch, and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, or with a few moist crumbs, but no batter.  Due to their small size and oven variance, make sure to watch your muffins closely, and bake until done. Allow muffins to cool in pans for about 10 minutes, or until they’ve firmed up and are cool enough to handle. Muffins are best fresh, but will keep airtight at room temperature for up to 5 days, or in the freezer for up to 4 months.

5 Drinks That Can Help You Lose Weight

Food & Nutrition, recipes
5 Drinks That Can Help You Lose Weight

Is what you drink affecting your ability to lose weight? The short answer is yes. Liquid calories play a huge part in our health, and the amount you consume is directly related to your ability to control the number on that scale.

Beverages go down quicker and easier than food. But that’s also the definition of “mindless” consumption: not paying attention while we’re doing other things like driving, working, watching television or sports, mingling, catching up with friends, etc.

Sodas, as most of the MyFitnessPal community knows, are liquid sugar. They do little to satiate hunger. But that’s also true of many other beverages, including energy drinks, iced lattes, bottled green teas, smoothies, sports drinks, alcoholic beverages, sweetened teas and, yes, even those fresh-pressed organic juices from your local juice bar. Most of these contain a lot of sugar and very little fiber to help keep you full. A few hundred calories per day can add up quickly, as many people fail to factor liquid calories into their daily intake.

Most sodas, bottled teas, energy drinks and sports drinks have sugar and calories listed on the container. Always read labels, and choose beverages with little- to no-added sugar and calories.

Alcohol is where things can get tricky, as calories, fat, sugar and carbohydrates aren’t required to be listed on labels. With 7 calories per gram of alcohol — it’s the second most concentrated source of calories, more than both carbohydrates and fat. It’s also absorbed directly into the bloodstream, meaning your body doesn’t burn extra calories in order to process and break it down.


Many of today’s trending craft beers have as much as 200–250 calories per pint, and that’s just for one. Wine has around 120 calories per 5-ounce pour, if you can limit it to just a glass. Cocktails mixed with sodas, simple syrups and tonic waters add up quickly, too — and come in much smaller portions that “vanish” rapidly. Limiting alcoholic beverages is one of the first steps you can take for successful weight loss.

But wait: The good news is there are a few things (other than water) that you can start sipping that may aid your efforts to shed some pounds. Drinking to promote better hydration, sleep and digestion can also help with weight-loss efforts. Here are five quaffs to consider.

We all know how important it is to drink enough water — it restores fluids lost through breathing, exercising and metabolism. It’s the number 1 thirst quencher … and cheap! But the timing could make a difference, too. When you start to feel hungry, drink some water. A 2015 study in the journal Obesity found that participants who drank about 2 glasses of water before meals were more likely to lose weight than those who skipped the glasses of water and went straight to eating.

Drinking green tea regularly may not only boost your fat fighting metabolism, but may also play a key role in weight maintenance and hunger suppression. One study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that in just two months, green tea drinkers lost an average of six pounds more than those who drank plain water. Green tea is also brimming with antioxidants and flavonoids that are good for overall health. Drink freshly brewed tea with no added sugar or cream — bottled store-bought varieties have fewer antioxidants (the  concentration decreases the longer tea sits after brewing) and are often pumped full of honey or sugar.

The morning java boost is a necessity for many of us, but there’s proof that the jolt may spur a better workout (translation: burn more calories). A 2015 study in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that participants could do almost 20% more leg presses and 12% more bench presses when they drank 2–3 cups of coffee before their workout. A similar 2011 study found an (albeit small) increase in energy expenditure both before and after exercise in the group that drank coffee before exercise.

In addition, coffee positively affects the hormones that help improve blood-sugar regulation. Maintaining stable blood sugar is essential to your well-being, overall fitness, regulating your hormones and plays a role in how much fat your body is able to store and burn.

But before you get too excited, we recommend you skip the sugar and heavy cream. The benefits noted above are singular to black coffee — not the mostly sugar and milk-based lattes, frappes, and mochas from Starbucks, McDonald’s and Dunkin Donuts, which sell drinks that may contain more than 1/4 cup (50 grams) of sugar!

This fizzy, pleasantly puckery fermented beverage is made by adding a probiotic-rich bacteria to lightly sweetened tea. More and more research is looking into gut health and how it relates to obesity and weight, finding that the millions of bacteria that live in our guts may play a large role by altering the way we store fat, how we balance blood sugar and how we respond to the hormones that make us feel hungry and full. Fueling our gut with beverages and foods that stimulate good bacteria may make losing weight easier than we ever thought possible. Kombucha is readily available in most supermarkets and comes loaded with probiotics — just be sure to look for brands with less than 5 grams sugar per serving.

We’ve said it here before: Sleep is essential for more efficient weight loss. Drinking turmeric-steeped warm milk before bed may help you catch more zzz’s. The brain uses calcium and tryptophan (both of which are found in dairy products) to make sleep-inducing melatonin.

Turmeric contains a component called curcumin, which may shrink the size of adipose cells and limit fat accumulation. Curcumin also stimulates antioxidant effects, reduces inflammation and may help relieve anxiety. Research on turmeric is still young, but it certainly can’t hurt to add this warming spice to your nightly routine.

8 Healthy Summer Foods to Add to Your Diet

Food & Nutrition, recipes
It’s summer—that amazing time of year when fresh produce abounds. Better yet: many of summer’s fruits and vegetables are brimming with secret health benefits.
Corn

1. Corn

Nothing says summer like fresh sweet corn. And did you know that two antioxidants—lutein and zeaxanthin—in corn may act like natural sunglasses, helping to form macular pigment that filters out some of the sun’s damaging rays? It’s true. The same antioxidants may also help lower your risk of developing age-related macular degeneration—the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 60 (though much of the damage occurs decades earlier).

Iced Coffee

Pictured Recipe: EatingWell Frozen Mochaccino

2. Iced Coffee

An iced pick-me-up is a great way to start your summer mornings. Better yet: drinking a single cup of coffee daily may lower your risk of developing skin cancer. In one study of more than 93,000 women, published in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention, those who drank one cup of caffeinated coffee a day reduced their risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer by about 10 percent. And the more they drank—up to about 6 cups or so per day—the lower their risk. Decaf didn’t seem to offer the same protection.

Tart Cherries

3. Tart Cherries

They deliver a host of health benefits. You may have heard that drinking tart cherry juice can help you get a better night’s sleep and quell post-workout pain (read more about that here). But did you know that compounds in tart cherries may also help you slim down and get leaner? When scientists at the University of Michigan Health System put rats on a high-fat diet supplemented with either a tart-cherry powder (equal to 1% of the weight of their total diet) or the same number of calories from carbohydrate, those that got the cherry powder gained less weight and body fat. Why? The anthocyanins in tart cherries activate a molecule that helps rev up fat burning and decrease fat storage.

Tomatoes

4. Tomatoes

There’s no question that sunscreen should be your first line of defense against the blazing summer sun. But eating tomatoes could give you a little extra protection: consuming more lycopene—the carotenoid that makes tomatoes red—may protect your skin from sunburn. In one study, participants who were exposed to UV light had almost 50 percent less skin reddening after they ate 2 1/2 tablespoons of tomato paste (or drank about 1 2/3 cups of carrot juice daily), in addition to their regular diet, for 10 to 12 weeks. Supplements, however, weren’t as effective: in the same study, those who received a lycopene supplement or synthetic lycopene weren’t significantly protected against sunburn.

5. Watermelon

5. Watermelon

Staying hydrated keeps your memory sharp and your mood stable. It also helps keep your body cool (by sweating) during hot summer months. The good news is that you don’t just have to drink water. You can eat it, too: in addition to delivering skin-protecting lycopene, watermelon is 92 percent water (hence the name). Another boon? Research shows that eating foods that are full of water helps keep you satisfied on fewer calories. (Interestingly enough, drinking water alongside foods doesn’t have the same effect.)

Raspberries

6. Raspberries

Raspberries are a great source of fiber—some of it soluble in the form of pectin, which helps lower cholesterol. One cup of raspberries has 8 grams of fiber—and a study in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that eating more fiber may help prevent weight gain or even promote weight loss. Over the course of a two-year study, researchers found that when study participants boosted their fiber by 8 grams for every 1,000 calories, they lost about 4 1/2 pounds. Try it for yourself. If you’re consuming 2,000 calories per day, aim to increase your fiber by 16 grams

Iced Tea

7. Iced Tea

Sure, a tall glass of iced tea on a hot day is refreshing, but did you know it might also do your body good? Studies show if you drink tea regularly, you may lower your risk of Alzheimer’s and diabetes, plus have healthier teeth and gums and stronger bones. How? Tea is rich in a class of antioxidants called flavonoids. Regardless of the variety—black, green, oolong, white or herbal—maximize the power of tea’s flavonoids by drinking it freshly brewed. If you want to keep a batch of cold tea in your refrigerator, “add a little lemon juice,” recommends Jeffrey Blumberg, Ph.D., director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. The citric acid and vitamin C in that squeeze of lemon—or lime, or orange—help preserve the flavonoids.

Blueberries

8. Blueberries

Fresh blueberries straight from the berry patch are a special treat! Turns out the antioxidants in them may help ward off muscle fatigue by mopping up the additional free radicals that muscles produce during exercise, according to recent research out of New Zealand.

Source: —Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D.

START TODAY… TRAIN WITH BK!

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Don’t wait to lose weight, start today! Train with BK!

Love yourself enough to FIGHT for your health! Your health is your wealth, invest in your future.

 

12 Slow-Cooked Meat-Lover Meals Under 450 Calories

Fitness on a Budget, Food & Nutrition, recipes, Uncategorized
    12 Slow-Cooked Meat-Lover Meals Under 450 Calories

Coming home after a tiring workday? Waking up late on a lazy Sunday morning? Some days you want nothing more than a hot, nourishing meal waiting for you at the table. That’s why we’ve gathered 12 meaty slow-cooker meals, bursting with flavor and protein, that let you just set it and forget it!

1. CROCK-POT BUFFALO CHICKEN LETTUCE WRAPS | SKINNYTASTE

All the flavors of Buffalo wings without all the added fat and calories? Sign us up! Try these at your next tailgating party. They’re so tasty, your guests won’t even miss the real deal. Recipe makes 6 servings at 1/2 cup chicken and veggies each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 148; Total Fat: 2g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 56mg; Sodium: 879mg; Carbohydrate: 5g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugar: 2g; Protein: 25g

2. SLOW COOKER COCONUT CURRY CHICKEN | BOYS AHOY

One taste of this spiced coconut curry chicken will leave your mouth craving more. Onions, carrots and bell peppers bulk up this easy recipe. To soak up the creamy curry sauce, serve with whole-grain rice, naan or noodles. If you’re a fan of heat, kick it up a notch with diced chili peppers or hot sauce. Recipe makes 6 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 366; Total Fat: 14g; Saturated Fat: 12g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 75mg; Sodium: 769mg; Carbohydrate: 24g; Dietary Fiber: 5g; Sugar: 11g; Protein: 38g

3. SLOW-COOKER LATIN CHICKEN WITH BLACK BEANS AND SWEET POTATOES | DELISH

Got 15 minutes in the morning? Prep this quick Latin chicken, and come home to spicy and smoky aromas wafting from your kitchen. This dish contains sweet potatoes and black beans, which provide a substantial amount of your daily fiber needs, at 7 grams per serving. Recipe makes 6 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 449; Total Fat: 14g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 2mg; Sodium: 369mg; Carbohydrate: 36g; Dietary Fiber: 7g; Sugar: 8g; Protein: 43g

4. SLOW COOKER IRISH BEEF STEW | COOK SMARTS

Simmer budget-friendly beef stew meats to tender, fall-apart perfection using your slow cooker. The trick is to tenderize the beef before cooking, then let it stew slowly using the gentle heat from your slow cooker. It’s hard to be patient when your home smells so delicious, but, trust us, it’s worth the wait. Recipe makes 4 servings at 2 cups each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 363; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 9mg; Sodium: 582mg; Carbohydrate: 35g; Dietary Fiber: 6g; Sugar: 7g; Protein: 27g

5. SLOW-COOKER PORK SLIDERS | MYFITNESSPAL’S ORIGINAL RECIPES

Slide these comforting Cuban sliders into your lunch box! This recipe uses lean pork shoulder simmered in a sweet, citrusy broth made from fresh orange and lime. Serve the meat on one whole-grain slider bun with a slice of Swiss cheese and some pickles for a complete meal. Recipe makes 8 servings at 1 slider each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 415; Total Fat: 17g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 8g; Cholesterol: 133mg; Sodium: 890mg; Carbohydrate: 21g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 6g; Protein: 43g

6. SLOW COOKER BARBACOA SHORT BEEF RIB TACOS | CAFE DELITES

Tender, juicy meat falling off the bone, rich in barbacoa flavors, is a surefire sign of a satisfying meal. Once you’re ready to eat, set up a taco station with bowls of cilantro, onion and avocado because — let’s be honest — garnishes make tacos extra delectable. Recipe makes 12 servings at 1 taco each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 363; Total Fat: 19g; Saturated Fat: 8g; Monounsaturated Fat: 8g; Cholesterol: 88mg; Sodium: 559mg; Carbohydrate: 15g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 3g; Protein: 30g

7. SLOW COOKER TURKEY CHILI | SKINNYTASTE

This mild, kid-friendly chili is made with lean ground turkey, corn, bell peppers, tomatoes and spices. Top with with crunchy baked tortilla chips, and watch your little ones gobble it up. This chili can also be made in large batches for freezing and reheating. Recipe makes 5 servings at 1 cup each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 222; Total Fat: 3g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 74mg; Sodium: 719mg; Total Carbohydrates: 20g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugars: 7g; Protein: 32g

8. CROCK POT CHICKEN TACOS | THE COZY COOK

Cumin-and-garlic-infused chicken gently simmers with black beans and corn for a nutritious, no-fuss Mexican-inspired dinner the whole family will enjoy. Recipe makes 8 servings at 1 flour tortilla + 1/8 filling each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 376; Total Fat: 14g; Saturated Fat: 7g; Monounsaturated Fat: 3g; Cholesterol: 69mg; Sodium: 656mg; Carbohydrate: 42g; Dietary Fiber: 8g; Sugar: 3g; Protein: 25g

9. SLOW COOKER TACO MEAT | COUPON CLIPPING COOK

Slow-cooked and saucy, this taco meat is brimming with seasonings — from oregano and cumin to garlic and chili powder — for maximum taste bud satisfaction. This is a recipe that’ll have you wanting to lick your fingers clean! Recipe makes 8 servings at 2 crispy taco shells + 1/8 filling each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 406; Total Fat: 22g; Saturated Fat: 8g; Monounsaturated Fat: 5g; Cholesterol: 71mg; Sodium: 255mg; Carbohydrate: 28g; Dietary Fiber: 6g; Sugar: 3g; Protein: 24g

10. EASY SLOW COOKER CHICKEN CHILI | HEALTHY NIBBLES & BITS

Come home to a warm, nourishing bowl of stew that soothes the soul — without needing to actually cook. This easy chicken chili takes only 10 minutes of prep time — your slow cooker handles the rest. By the time you get home, you’ll have a chunky chili packed with chicken, beans and veggies in addition to an entire house filled with inviting, savory aromas! Recipe makes 8 servings at 1 1/2 cups each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 248; Total Fat: 2g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 52mg; Sodium: 390mg; Carbohydrate: 34g; Dietary Fiber: 7g; Sugar: 6g; Protein: 24g

11. SLOW COOKER JERK CHICKEN | THE HEALTHY MAVEN

This recipe for jerk chicken bathes chicken drumsticks in a flavorful jerk spice, slow-cooks it for four hours and quick-broils it for added crispiness. Imagine coming home to that meal! This dish pairs well with rice, beans and/or a side salad for a complete meal. Recipe makes 5 servings at 2 drumsticks each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 253 ; Total Fat: 12 g; Saturated Fat: 6 g; Monounsaturated Fat: 5 g; Cholesterol: 184mg; Sodium: 376 mg; Carbohydrate: 6 g; Dietary Fiber: 1 g; Sugar: 4 g; Protein 34 g

12. SLOW COOKER ASIAN CHICKEN LETTUCE WRAPS | COOKING CLASSY

Sweet and salty, these Asian chicken lettuce wraps make an easy lunch or dinner with only 15 minutes of prep! Crisp iceberg lettuce makes this dish all the more refreshing and lower in carbs — a double win! Not a fan of lettuce? Serve over a bed of shredded cabbage or mixed greens instead. Recipe makes 6 servings at 2 wraps each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 338; Total Fat: 15g; Saturated Fat: 2g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 91mg; Sodium: 723mg; Carbohydrate: 32g; Dietary Fiber: 4g; Sugar: 13g; Protein: 34g

 BY MYFITNESSPAL’S RECIPES

8 Food Myths You Need To Stop Believing

Fitness on a Budget, Food & Nutrition, Motivation, Inspiration and Encouragement, recipes, Uncategorized
8 Food Myths You Need To Stop Believing

You can find healthy eating advice on every corner. That doesn’t mean it’s good advice, though. Nutrition research can be confusing, and it’s always changing. Throw in the sensationalistic headlines and the rate at which information is spread, and it’s no wonder the nutrition tips or suggestions you get from your friend are unsound. Best-case scenario, following bad advice means you unnecessarily avoid your favorite foods. Worst-case, you end up choosing the unhealthier option all while thinking you’re making a better choice.

We zeroed in on eight myths about healthy eating that especially need to die.

MYTH #1: EGG YOLKS ARE BAD FOR YOU

Dietary cholesterol has been wrongly accused of raising our blood cholesterol levels for years. It’s become clearer that saturated fats and trans fats are more influential in raising blood cholesterol levels. And while eggs—the yolks included—are high in cholesterol, they are relatively low in saturated fats. Lots of research has been done in recent years, and the verdict is that the entire egg can actually be a part of a healthy diet and in most people, do not significantly impact cholesterol levels or heart disease risk.

MYTH #2: COFFEE IS DEHYDRATING

Yes, coffee is a diuretic (aka, promotes urine production), but it’s an extremely mild one. It also has a lot of water in it and therefore actually counts toward your daily fluid intake. The amount it would take to dehydrate you is more than anyone should be consuming in a day—if you have two or three cups daily, your fluid levels will be completely fine.

MYTH #3: NATURAL SUGAR IS DIFFERENT FROM ADDED SUGAR

Sugar is sugar is sugar. On a molecular level, the sugar in an apple is the same as the sugar you spoon into your coffee cup. There can be a difference in how our bodies break down the sugar when it’s combined with other nutrients like fiber and protein, but simply being natural doesn’t cut it. Sugar in a whole fruit comes with fiber and helps slow digestion and prevent blood sugar spikes. That’s better than sugar that comes void of other nutrients. But when you squeeze out the juice and drink it, or eat maple syrup, agave syrup, or honey, your body reacts the same way it would to table sugar or the sugar in a Coke.

 

MYTH #4: ORGANIC FOOD IS AUTOMATICALLY HEALTHY

The word “organic” comes with a big health halo around it, like everything with the label is automatically good for you. The truth is that organic snacks are still snacks. Eating them in excess isn’t suddenly OK because they meet the requirements for an organic label. “Organic chocolate syrup is still chocolate syrup,” Caroline Kaufman, R.D., tells SELF. Organic cookies, crackers, chips, and candies have the same amount of sugar, fat, and empty calories as non-organic versions. When it comes to produce, choosing organic versions of the “dirty dozen”—the foods that typically have the highest amount of pesticides on them—is a good way to cut back on chemical exposure. But Kaufman adds that conventionally grown produce is still safe to eat, since it’s monitored to ensure pesticide residue stays below a certain limit.

MYTH #5: MARGARINE IS AUTOMATICALLY BETTER THAN BUTTER

Margarine become popular in the fat-is-bad era, but many actually contain trans fats, which are worse for you than the naturally occurring saturated fat in butter. Butter’s ingredient list is short and sweet and doesn’t contain extra ingredients to make up for lack of taste. Not all fake butter is bad, but you have to be cautious about what you’re buying. “I always look at the ingredient list first,” Lori Zanini, R.D., spokesperson for the Association of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. “Stick margarines are not recommended due to the fact that they contain hydrogenated oils (aka trans fats). Spreads that are in tubs can be considered, just make sure the ingredients are beneficial,” she adds. Look for ones with olive oil to get a good dose of healthy plant-based fat.

MYTH #6: SALADS ARE ALWAYS THE HEALTHIEST OPTION ON THE MENU

You’d think that choosing the salad is safe. But all the add-ons piled atop a bed of lettuce can make the sugar, fat, and calorie count just as high as the mouthwatering burger you’re trying to resist. “Watch out for tricky salad toppings that add up quickly: creamy, bottled dressings; cheese; bacon; croutons; or sweetened, dried fruit,” Zanini says. Other ingredients, like avocado and nuts, are healthy in small amounts but are usually served in too-large portion sizes, Kaufman says. To make sure your salad is as healthy as possible, look for one with leafy greens, lean protein (fried chicken doesn’t count), a small serving of healthy fat, and an oil-based dressing on the side. The oil helps you absorb all the fat-soluble nutrients you’re eating, and keeps you away from caloric creamy dressing.

MYTH #7: LOW-FAT VERSIONS ARE BETTER THAN THE ORIGINALS

If you’re still buying low-fat varieties of naturally fatty foods (I’m looking at you, coffee creamer), you might be doing yourself a disservice. “Fat is a necessary part of a healthy diet. You need fat in your diet. Fat is not bad. Fat does not go directly to your hips,” Kaufman reassures. Any extra calories you eat that your body can’t use can be converted into body fat, not just dietary fat. Fat is more densely caloric, though, which is both a blessing and a curse. “Because fat is so rich in calories, it is also very satisfying. That’s good because ideally it means you could mindfully eator use a small amount to feel full,” says Kaufman. It also means you need to watch your portion sizes. When fat is removed from foods, it’s usually replaced by sugar or salt, so it’s important to read the ingredients list before choosing the adulterated version. Usually, you’re better off eating a small serving of the full-fat kind so you actually enjoy it and feel satiated, Kaufman says.

MYTH #8: EVERYONE WILL BENEFIT FROM GIVING UP GLUTEN

“Eating gluten free is not necessarily healthier if you do not have Celiac disease or a gluten intolerance/sensitivity,” Zanini says. It’s also important to note that not all gluten-free foods are created equally, or healthfully. “Gluten-free breads and baked goods may still use nutrient-poor, refined flours,” she explains. They can also be high in sugar. If you think you might be sensitive to gluten, or have any of the symptoms of Celiac disease, see an R.D. to ask about being tested. If wheat products don’t make you feel crummy, swearing them off isn’t going to make you a healthier person.

Source: by Self

6 Easy Egg Recipes Under 250 Calories

Food & Nutrition, recipes, Uncategorized

Eggs are a top-logged food for a reason. High in protein and supremely versatile, eggs aren’t just for breakfast. These simple, quick egg dishes are ready in minutes and a great way to start, or end, your day.

1. SOY SAUCE AND GREEN ONION SCRAMBLED EGGS | BOWL OF DELICIOUS

With a total preparation time of 5 minutes, this recipe is a no-brainer. Using low-sodium soy sauce adds flavor without unnecessary additional sodium. Recipe makes 2 servings at 2 eggs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 218; Total Fat: 16g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 9g; Cholesterol: 372mg; Sodium: 374mg; Carbohydrate: 3g; Dietary Fiber: 0g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 14g

2. BREAKFAST EGG CUP | HELLO GLOW

Eggs, bacon and vegetables offer everything you want in a meal without the hassle. Add the ingredients together in an oven-safe container, then bake while you get ready. Recipe makes 2 servings at 2 eggs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 244; Total Fat: 18g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 8g; Cholesterol: 377mg; Sodium: 374mg; Carbohydrate: 5g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 15g

3. CHEESY ZUCCHINI QUINOA EGG MUFFINS | SPOONFUL OF FLAVOR

This simple recipe can be prepped in advance and frozen for those moments when you don’t have time to cook. Recipe makes 10 servings at 1 muffin each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 70; Total Fat: 3g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 76mg; Sodium: 174mg; Carbohydrate: 6g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 6g

4. 5-MINUTE SALTY-SWEET BREAKFAST | IOWA GIRL EATS

Use the last of your summer peaches in this sweet-and-savory egg dish. Ready in 5 minutes and providing 6 grams of fiber and 12 grams of protein, this is an ideal post-workout meal. Recipe makes 1 serving at 1 egg each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 225; Total Fat: 8g; Saturated Fat: 2g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 179mg; Sodium: 287mg; Carbohydrate: 30g; Dietary Fiber: 6g; Sugar: 9g; Protein: 12g

5. SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH MATCHA AND LIME | A COUPLE COOKS

Matcha is making headlines as an energy-boosting superfood, so why not add it to your eggs? Its subtle flavor is brightened by a splash of lime for an easy scramble featuring 13 grams of protein. Recipe makes 4 servings at 2 eggs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 168; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 377mg; Sodium: 443mg; Carbohydrate: 3g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 13g

6. EGG WHITE SCRAMBLE | I FOOD REAL

Egg whites are a good way to increase your protein since more than half of the protein comes from the white. This scramble comes in at less than 150 calories per serving and packs a generous 17 grams of protein. Recipe makes 2 servings at 3 egg whites each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 127; Total Fat: 1g; Saturated Fat: g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 300mg; Carbohydrate: 11g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 5g; Protein: 17g

Source: My Fitness Pal

🍰 8 No-Bake Desserts Under 300 Calories

Food & Nutrition, recipes, Uncategorized
8 No-Bake Desserts Under 300 Calories

As the weather cools down, that comfort food craving will start to slowly creep up — even for dessert. Stay within your goals with these no-bake treats and frozen desserts that are quick, easy-to-make and crowd pleasing — no oven necessary.

1. MANGO GREEN TEA POPS | MINIMALIST BAKER

Cool down with an antioxidant-packed sweet treat. Creamy and naturally sweetened, these two-toned popsicles are made with just five ingredients — mango, matcha powder, coconut milk, agave (or preferred sweetener) and lemon juice. Recipe makes 6 popsicles.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 93; Total Fat: 5g; Saturated Fat: 3.5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 16mg; Carbohydrate: 11g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 9g; Protein: 1g

2. STRAWBERRY CHEESECAKE PARFAITS | IVY MANNING

Creamy, yet light, these individual parfaits use the natural sweetness in strawberries to carry this dessert to deliciousness. It’s perfect for experimenting, too: use blueberries and vanilla yogurt or whatever combination strikes your fancy. Recipe makes 4 servings at 4 tablespoons yogurt mixture, 1/3 cup strawberries and 2 tablespoons cracker crumbs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 185; Total Fat: 8g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 24mg; Sodium: 148mg; Carbohydrate: 23g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugar: 14g; Protein: 6g

3. DARK CHOCOLATE AVOCADO MOUSSE | HELLO GLOW

This decadent-tasting dessert satisfies even the most hard-core chocoholic. Creamy avocado and rich dark chocolate make this vegan mousse luscious but still healthy. Cocoa powder contains antioxidants while avocados are a good source of healthy monounsaturated fats. Recipe makes 4 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 80; Total Fat: 6g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 13mg; Carbohydrate: 7g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 2g; Protein: 1g

4. NO-BAKE STRAWBERRIES & CREAM CRÊPE CAKE | SKINNYTASTE

Impress family and friends with an elegant cake made of crepes. This fancy-looking cake is made by layering delicate crepes with a Greek yogurt cream filling and fresh strawberries. The crepes can be made ahead and assembled before serving. Recipe makes 12 servings at 1 slice each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 182; Total Fat: 9g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 3g; Cholesterol: 44mg; Sodium: 47mg; Carbohydrate: 22g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugar: 13g; Protein: 5g

5. HEALTHY OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE DOUGH “ICE CREAM” | EATING BIRD FOOD

For a healthy spin on cookie dough ice cream, whip up this tasty frozen treat. This vegan, gluten-free, five-ingredient recipe blends frozen bananas with oats, raisins, almond milk and cinnamon. Recipe makes 2 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 213; Total Fat: 2g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 20mg; Carbohydrate: 51g; Dietary Fiber: 5g; Sugar: 26g; Protein: 4g

6. NO-BAKE LEMON PISTACHIO SHORTBREAD COOKIE BITES | COTTER CRUNCH

Bright and lemony, these cookie bites are vegan friendly and taste like shortbread cookies. Each bite is filled with pistachios, almond butter and a hint of honey. Recipe makes 25 servings at 1 cookie bite each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 77; Total Fat: 5g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 18mg; Carbohydrate: 8g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 4g; Protein: 2g

7. AVOCADO MINT FUDGE BARS | IFOODREAL

Get an extra dose of greens with these minty, sweet fudge bars. Made of creamy avocados, bananas, honey and crunchy cacao nibs, these naturally sweetened treats are full of healthy fats. Recipe makes 16 servings at 1 bar each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 136; Total Fat: 12g; Saturated Fat: 8g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 11mg; Carbohydrate: 7g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 5g; Protein: 0g

8. MINI COCONUT-BANANA CREAM PIES | 24 CARROT LIFE

These mini pies feature a quick, made-from-scratch crust filled with creamy bananas. These frozen pie bites have no added sugar and and even pack some protein. If you’re craving something sweet, these treats are perfect for any occasion. Recipe makes 4 servings at 1 mini pie each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 258; Total Fat: 16g; Saturated Fat: 12g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 1mg; Sodium: 42mg; Carbohydrate: 21g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 12g; Protein: 9g

Source: MYFITNESSPAL’S RECIPES
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