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Food & Nutrition Holiday Fast Track Humor Motivation, Inspiration and Encouragement

How to eat healthy while still enjoying graduation party season

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 With the end of the year and warmer weather comes celebration. And celebration often means delicious, decadent food and lots of it. Whether it be at a graduation party, family reunion or backyard barbecue with friends, there always seems to be a scrumptious spread calling your name. And let’s not forget the dessert table.
Overindulging at one celebration might not be so bad, but what happens when you have three parties to attend in one weekend? Before you know it, you’ll find yourself feeling tired, bloated and a perhaps a few pounds heavier—just in time for swimsuit season.

So how can you keep your body happy and healthy without missing the fun that summer celebrations bring? Read on for nine tips on how to enjoy parties while still keeping your health in mind.

1. Eat before you go.

Heading out to a graduation soiree where you know there will be killer desserts? Try eating a light, healthy meal before you go. You won’t be hungry for the main event like fatty fried chicken and instead will have room for that slice of cake. Even the smallest snack can help when it comes to having control over the buffet table. Just remember, no matter what you do, don’t go to a party starving. You’re likely to enter a “see-all-eat-all” mentality and go overboard.

2. Bring a healthy dish to pass.

By bringing a dish to pass, you’ll at least know there will be one healthy option to eat. Serve yourself a portion of your healthy contribution and supplement it with smaller portions of a few more indulgent items. Not only can you keep your diet in check, but you’ll also enable others to enjoy a lighter option.

3. Taste test.

The first time you visit the food spread, take a little bit of everything you want to try. Give it all a taste and decide on your favorites. Then go back and dish up what you know you will truly enjoy. This will prevent you from eating foods that are just so-so to your taste buds but are also high in calories and fat.

4. Distract yourself.

After trip one to the dessert table, walk away. Don’t stand or sit near it, as this can increase the temptation to make a return trip. Instead, offer to help the host out with dishes, take a break from the party to walk around the park or venture to the backyard to check out what else might be going on.

5. Be active.

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After eating, don’t just sit around. Instead, get up and join in that slow-pitch softball game, round of cornhole or sand volleyball match. You might even burn enough calories to warrant an extra piece of cake!

6. Be mindful of your beverages.

Sure, nothing says it’s a party like a cold Spotted Cow or a fruity margarita. And by “a,” I mean one. Calories from beverages — whether it be from beer, mixed drinks, lemonade, punch or soda — can add up fast. Guzzle down two cans of Coke and you’ve just consumed 280 calories and nearly 80 grams of sugars. That’s about 20 teaspoons! Bottom line: it’s just as important to choose your beverages carefully as it is to choose your eats. Stick to one beverage of choice and then switch to water, diet soda or unsweetened tea.

7. Pack along a piece of gum.

After you’ve finished your first plate, whip out this little lifesaver. Choose a minty flavor to curb any cravings for another piece of chocolate cheesecake and to help take your mind off of food.

8. Balance your plate.

Just as you would for a typical dinner around the table at home, try to balance your plate. Load at least half of it with fruits and veggies, a quarter with lean protein, and the other quarter with grains. (Whole grains are best!)

9. Use a dessert plate.

Swing by the dessert table first before hitting up the food, but only to snatch a smaller, dessert-sized plate. Ditching an oversized dinner plate in favor of a smaller plate aids in portion control and will prevent you from overindulging right off the bat.

Now, I’d have to admit that part of the “party” is definitely the food, and that it’s perfectly okay to indulge every once in a while. But for all those other times, stick to these nine tips and you’ll be on your way to celebrating not only the occasion but also your commitment to a healthier lifestyle!

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Holiday Fast Track Uncategorized

Happy Healthy Holidays!

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Happy holiday’s from BK and the Bricks By Bk crew! Enjoy your day. 

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Holiday Fast Track Uncategorized

Your 9-Step Strategy to Maintain Your Weight During the Holidays

 

BY DARYA ROSE

NOVEMBER 3, 2017

 

Categories
Holiday Fast Track Motivation, Inspiration and Encouragement Uncategorized

9 ways to survive the holidays when you’re alone

 (fotostorm)

The holidays can be a bittersweet time of year. On the one hand, you’ve got twinkle lights, hot chocolate, and holiday cheer galore. On the other, you’re surrounded by not-so-subtle reminders of what’s missing in your life—particularly, if you’re separated, divorced, or widowed. And even if you’re content with being single the rest of the year, the idea of not having a significant other to swap gifts with can be enough to make you question your life choices. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

“Single people shouldn’t look to simply survive the holidays, but rather, use the reflective time of the season to thrive,” says Paul Hokemeyer, PhD, a Manhattan-based marriage and family therapist (check out these 7 awesome benefits of being single) . “To do this, they must gently shift their view of the holidays from an externally defined time of year to an internally defined one.”

At their most basic level, he explains, Christmas represents a period of rebirth and Hanukkah a time to regain control of one’s life. By digging deep, you’ll anchor yourself in something solid and real, and in turn, connect to the essence of the season. Here’s how to get started. (Let’s stay in touch! Sign up to get FREE health, weight loss, and relationship tips delivered straight to your inbox!)

Fess up about how you feel.

When the people around you are all merry and bright and you’re, well, not, sucking it up because you’re not “supposed” to feel bad during the holidays just leads to more crappy feelings. “Acknowledging your emotions gives you the opportunity to let them go,” says Vivian Sierra, a licensed marriage and family therapist in St. Louis. By suppressing them, you’re basically allowing your life to get stuck in neutral. “Being authentic is the gateway to future healthy relationships—and ultimately, love,” she says. Translation: Take the time to put your feet up and get your bah humbug on. (These 8 tricks will beat a rotten mood in 60 seconds flat.)

Get out there, even if you don’t feel like it.

It’s natural to assume that the link between behavior and mood only goes in one direction. (Think: “I feel depressed and therefore skipped the Christmas party.”) However, it’s a 2-way street more often than we realize—you may feel depressed precisely because you’re dodging holiday invites, and in turn, not coming into contact with more positive stimuli. “Increasing pleasant and meaningful activities have been shown to have broad support for individuals who have problems with mood,” says Jason Holland, PhD, geropsychologist and assistant professor at William James College in Boston. So force yourself to put at least one party on your calendar this month. You might be surprised by how much fun you have. (And if not? Well, it’s just one party.)

Develop a plan for dealing with potential holiday triggers.

For someone who’s adjusting to post-divorce singledom or widowhood, the holidays can bring back painful memories and exacerbate feelings of loneliness, says Holland. Stay ahead of the curve by clearly defining the people, places, or things that may trigger negative thoughts or emotions during the holiday season, he suggests, then come up with a game plan for how to best manage these situations before they crop up. Example: If your late husband’s sister is a drama queen and visits always leave you feeling on edge, come up with a reason ahead of time for why you can only stay at her place for an hour. Maybe that reason is meeting up with a friend who always puts you in a good mood.

Shake up your holiday routine.

“Switching things up gives your brain a workout by encouraging new associations versus the old neural pathways,” explains Nancy Irwin, PsyD, a Los Angeles-based therapist. If you and your ex-husband had a specific holiday itinerary that you followed every year, interrupting your old patterns can help lessen the blow—even little things like preparing different foods, shopping at different stores, or watching different movies can help you miss that person less.

Be proactive.

Planning ahead is always the best way to ward off a case of the lonelies, especially during the holidays. Reach out to friends, family, and acquaintances in advance and casually ask what their plans are. Once you share that you don’t have any plans, they’re likely to invite you to join them. “It’s important to remember that when we’re lonely, we tend to underestimate how much those around us care about us and would be happy to spend the holidays together,” says A.J. Marsden, PhD, assistant professor of human services and psychology at Beacon College in Florida. If this strategy is too awkward, who says you can’t do the inviting? Plan a shindig specifically for people who don’t have plans. (Feeling lonely is as unhealthy as smoking 15 cigarettes a day—but here’s how to fight it.)

Get back to your roots.

Think back to a time when the holidays gave you the warm and fuzzies—what were the rituals or traditions that you loved most? Bringing them back into your present can help you regain that spark. “Rituals induce calm and relieve stress by projecting a sense of order and control into the unpredictability of life,” says Sierra. “They provide a sense of continuity and belonging that significantly contribute to mental health.”

Reach out to long lost friends and relatives.

Just because you’re unable to spend time with certain family members or friends during the holidays doesn’t mean you can’t connect with them in other ways. “Reaching out to your social connections is good for your mental and emotional health,” says Sierra. It boosts your sense of belonging, while also strengthening your social network. All it takes is a festive text message, a funny Facebook post, or an old-school Christmas card to let someone know you care, which boosts their overall wellness too. It’s a win-win. (Just make sure you’re not breaking one of these 14 Facebook etiquette rules that will get you unfriended fast.)

Do some good.

It can be frightening to see the dark places your mind can wander to when given the opportunity. “Too much time on one’s hands can be dangerous,” says Hokemeyer. “Get out of the house and into the service of others.” Finding community service opportunities is easy, and not only will providing service boost your mood and morale, but it may also foster connections with new people.

Don’t put so much pressure on yourself.

Try not to force yourself to have a certain type of holiday experience this year, or for “things to ‘be a certain way,'” says Marsden. Keep it simple, and remember that “spending the holidays alone can be a very enjoyable experience if you make time for yourself,” she says.

One place to start: Getting some fresh air. Recent research has shown that exercise can help ease depression, especially during the holidays, notes Marsden. Plus, “exercise releases endorphins that make us feel good and spending time outdoors can help increase vitamin D, which also helps ease depression.”

By Krissy Brady

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Before & After Photos fitness Fitness on a Budget Food & Nutrition Uncategorized

🎄🎁HOLIDAY’S ARE A TRAP,  TRAIN W/BK AND STAY ON TRACK! 

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I’ve been where you are. I know the struggle of trying to losing weight time after time, year after year. Down deep inside you know you need to do & feel better — you just don’t know how to jump start your plan and most importantly, sick to it. Well….

Lets schedule your 1-on-1 coaching session today!📆bricksbybk@gmail.com 📧
(909)275-8679 Text or call

Don’t wait until the doctor tells you, you’re pre-diabetic or that you NEED to lose weight, or you get to your kids school and can barely breath from walking up the stairs to your kids classroom. Make your health a top priority.

Nothing tastes as good as healthy feels. 🤸‍♀️🤸‍♀️🚵‍♀️👨‍👩‍👦

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Food & Nutrition Holiday Fast Track Uncategorized

Halloween Top 15 Mini Size Candy Bars

Halloween Candy BarsHalloween is a tempting time with literally hundreds of candies out there to buy. While you may have the best intention to pass them out to the kids, sometimes you can’t help but sneak a few in for yourself. We’ve taken a look at some of the most popular candy bars so you can be aware of the calories they could add to your daily plan. Everyone here at CalorieKing wishes you and your family a safe and healthy Halloween!

Halloween Candy Guide – Top 15 Mini Size Bars

Calories Fat (g) Carbs (g)
3 Musketeers, fun size, 3 bars, 1.6 oz 190 6 24
Almond Joy, snack size, 1 bar, 0.6 oz 80 4.5 10
Baby Ruth, fun size, 2 bars, 1.3 oz 170 8 24
Butterfinger, fun size, 1 bar, 0.75 oz 100 4 15
Heath, snack size, 3 pieces, 1.5 oz 230 14 27
Hershey’s miniatures assortment, 5 pcs, 1.5 oz 210 13 25
Kit Kat, snack size, 6 pieces, 1.48 oz 210 11 27
Milky Way, fun size, 2 bars, 1.2 oz 150 6 24
170 8 24
Mounds, snack size, 1 bar, 0.6 oz 80 4.5 10
Nestle’s Crunch, fun size, 3 bars, 1.34 oz 180 9 26
PayDay, snack size, 1 bar, 0.7 oz 90 10 24
Reese’s PB Cups, snack size, 1 cup, 0.75 oz 110 6.5 12
Reese’s Sticks, snack size, 1 stick, 0.6 oz 90 5 10
Snickers, fun size, 2 bars, 1.2 oz 160 8 21
Twix, 3 mini pieces, 1 oz 150 8 20
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