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Fitness on a Budget Food & Nutrition Motivation, Inspiration and Encouragement recipes Uncategorized

8 Food Myths You Need To Stop Believing

8 Food Myths You Need To Stop Believing

You can find healthy eating advice on every corner. That doesn’t mean it’s good advice, though. Nutrition research can be confusing, and it’s always changing. Throw in the sensationalistic headlines and the rate at which information is spread, and it’s no wonder the nutrition tips or suggestions you get from your friend are unsound. Best-case scenario, following bad advice means you unnecessarily avoid your favorite foods. Worst-case, you end up choosing the unhealthier option all while thinking you’re making a better choice.

We zeroed in on eight myths about healthy eating that especially need to die.

MYTH #1: EGG YOLKS ARE BAD FOR YOU

Dietary cholesterol has been wrongly accused of raising our blood cholesterol levels for years. It’s become clearer that saturated fats and trans fats are more influential in raising blood cholesterol levels. And while eggs—the yolks included—are high in cholesterol, they are relatively low in saturated fats. Lots of research has been done in recent years, and the verdict is that the entire egg can actually be a part of a healthy diet and in most people, do not significantly impact cholesterol levels or heart disease risk.

MYTH #2: COFFEE IS DEHYDRATING

Yes, coffee is a diuretic (aka, promotes urine production), but it’s an extremely mild one. It also has a lot of water in it and therefore actually counts toward your daily fluid intake. The amount it would take to dehydrate you is more than anyone should be consuming in a day—if you have two or three cups daily, your fluid levels will be completely fine.

MYTH #3: NATURAL SUGAR IS DIFFERENT FROM ADDED SUGAR

Sugar is sugar is sugar. On a molecular level, the sugar in an apple is the same as the sugar you spoon into your coffee cup. There can be a difference in how our bodies break down the sugar when it’s combined with other nutrients like fiber and protein, but simply being natural doesn’t cut it. Sugar in a whole fruit comes with fiber and helps slow digestion and prevent blood sugar spikes. That’s better than sugar that comes void of other nutrients. But when you squeeze out the juice and drink it, or eat maple syrup, agave syrup, or honey, your body reacts the same way it would to table sugar or the sugar in a Coke.

 

MYTH #4: ORGANIC FOOD IS AUTOMATICALLY HEALTHY

The word “organic” comes with a big health halo around it, like everything with the label is automatically good for you. The truth is that organic snacks are still snacks. Eating them in excess isn’t suddenly OK because they meet the requirements for an organic label. “Organic chocolate syrup is still chocolate syrup,” Caroline Kaufman, R.D., tells SELF. Organic cookies, crackers, chips, and candies have the same amount of sugar, fat, and empty calories as non-organic versions. When it comes to produce, choosing organic versions of the “dirty dozen”—the foods that typically have the highest amount of pesticides on them—is a good way to cut back on chemical exposure. But Kaufman adds that conventionally grown produce is still safe to eat, since it’s monitored to ensure pesticide residue stays below a certain limit.

MYTH #5: MARGARINE IS AUTOMATICALLY BETTER THAN BUTTER

Margarine become popular in the fat-is-bad era, but many actually contain trans fats, which are worse for you than the naturally occurring saturated fat in butter. Butter’s ingredient list is short and sweet and doesn’t contain extra ingredients to make up for lack of taste. Not all fake butter is bad, but you have to be cautious about what you’re buying. “I always look at the ingredient list first,” Lori Zanini, R.D., spokesperson for the Association of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. “Stick margarines are not recommended due to the fact that they contain hydrogenated oils (aka trans fats). Spreads that are in tubs can be considered, just make sure the ingredients are beneficial,” she adds. Look for ones with olive oil to get a good dose of healthy plant-based fat.

MYTH #6: SALADS ARE ALWAYS THE HEALTHIEST OPTION ON THE MENU

You’d think that choosing the salad is safe. But all the add-ons piled atop a bed of lettuce can make the sugar, fat, and calorie count just as high as the mouthwatering burger you’re trying to resist. “Watch out for tricky salad toppings that add up quickly: creamy, bottled dressings; cheese; bacon; croutons; or sweetened, dried fruit,” Zanini says. Other ingredients, like avocado and nuts, are healthy in small amounts but are usually served in too-large portion sizes, Kaufman says. To make sure your salad is as healthy as possible, look for one with leafy greens, lean protein (fried chicken doesn’t count), a small serving of healthy fat, and an oil-based dressing on the side. The oil helps you absorb all the fat-soluble nutrients you’re eating, and keeps you away from caloric creamy dressing.

MYTH #7: LOW-FAT VERSIONS ARE BETTER THAN THE ORIGINALS

If you’re still buying low-fat varieties of naturally fatty foods (I’m looking at you, coffee creamer), you might be doing yourself a disservice. “Fat is a necessary part of a healthy diet. You need fat in your diet. Fat is not bad. Fat does not go directly to your hips,” Kaufman reassures. Any extra calories you eat that your body can’t use can be converted into body fat, not just dietary fat. Fat is more densely caloric, though, which is both a blessing and a curse. “Because fat is so rich in calories, it is also very satisfying. That’s good because ideally it means you could mindfully eator use a small amount to feel full,” says Kaufman. It also means you need to watch your portion sizes. When fat is removed from foods, it’s usually replaced by sugar or salt, so it’s important to read the ingredients list before choosing the adulterated version. Usually, you’re better off eating a small serving of the full-fat kind so you actually enjoy it and feel satiated, Kaufman says.

MYTH #8: EVERYONE WILL BENEFIT FROM GIVING UP GLUTEN

“Eating gluten free is not necessarily healthier if you do not have Celiac disease or a gluten intolerance/sensitivity,” Zanini says. It’s also important to note that not all gluten-free foods are created equally, or healthfully. “Gluten-free breads and baked goods may still use nutrient-poor, refined flours,” she explains. They can also be high in sugar. If you think you might be sensitive to gluten, or have any of the symptoms of Celiac disease, see an R.D. to ask about being tested. If wheat products don’t make you feel crummy, swearing them off isn’t going to make you a healthier person.

Source: by Self

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fitness Motivation, Inspiration and Encouragement Uncategorized Weekly Workout Meet Up! Workout Wednesday

4 Healthy Swaps to Help You Lose Weight

4 Healthy Swaps to Help You Lose Weight

Although you work out and stay physically fit, you can always boost your efforts to make healthy choices and stave off extra pounds. To start, try healthy lifestyle swaps like these four below, which can impact your overall well-being.

AFTERNOON SWAP

Why: Research published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicinesuggests ingesting caffeine hours before nightfall causes a disturbance in sleep. In this study, participants who consumed caffeine up to six hours before bed lost more than an hour of sleep.

The Swap: To avoid the 4 p.m. slump, hit the stairs. A new study published inPhysiology & Behavior found that 10 minutes of walking up and down stairs at a regular pace was more likely to make participants feel energized than ingesting 50 milligrams of caffeine. (This is the equivalent to about a cup of green tea (59 mg), two cans of soda (58 mg) or just less than a shot of espresso (63 mg)).

WORK SWAP

Why: The American Heart Association released a science advisory on the dangers of sedentary behavior. It states that Americans, on average, sit 6–8 hours per day, which leads to all types of health issues, ranging from diabetes to death. Even those who stay active in their personal time don’t have the same problematic health reductions as those who move more.

The Swap: To improve your daily mobility, try switching your smaller work meetings, such as one-on-ones, to walking meetings. “The goal with walking meetings isn’t to sweat up a storm. The goal is just to integrate a little more natural movement into daily life,” says Dani Singer, fitness director of Fit2Go Personal Training in Baltimore, Maryland. “The boost you receive in mood and energy will pay off much higher than the calories you burn.” As added bonuses: research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychologysuggests that walking leads to increased creative thinking, and an exploratory study from the Harvard Business Review proposes that walking meetings support better cognitive engagement on the job.

VACATION SWAPS

Why: A vacation may not only leave you with extra weight, but it can hang around for six weeks post vacation. In a study published in Physiology & Behavior, participants who took a one- to three-week vacation gained an average of almost 1 pound. To put this amount in perspective, the average American gains 1–2 pounds per year.

The Swap: Skip the depressing hotel gym and build exercise into your vacation by doing what the locals do. “Different places often have different cultures when it comes to exercise, and trying working out their way can add a fantastic experience to your trip. In India, try yoga; in China, try tai chi,” says Julia Buckley, a trainer in the U.K. and author of “The Fat Burn Revolution.” “Change your mindset from seeing exercise as a chore which you shouldn’t have to do on vacation to thinking of it as something that will enhance your vacation by energizing your body and calming your mind.”

SHOPPING SWAP

Why: Although the percentage of online shoppers continues to outpace in-person buyers, the statistics show people still prefer brick-and-mortar stores.Retail TouchPoints, an online publishing network for retail executives, conducted a survey of consumers and found that 85% prefer to shop in person because they like to touch and feel products before they purchase; 36% don’t like waiting for items to be delivered and 30% like to receive advice on what products they should purchase.

The Swap: Park your car far from the front and enjoy the time spent strolling around — you’re burning calories. Use a basket instead of a shopping cart if you’re only picking up a few items. To find out how many calories you’ll burn, use the MapMyRun calorie calculator.

 

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Food & Nutrition recipes Uncategorized

6 Easy Egg Recipes Under 250 Calories

Eggs are a top-logged food for a reason. High in protein and supremely versatile, eggs aren’t just for breakfast. These simple, quick egg dishes are ready in minutes and a great way to start, or end, your day.

1. SOY SAUCE AND GREEN ONION SCRAMBLED EGGS | BOWL OF DELICIOUS

With a total preparation time of 5 minutes, this recipe is a no-brainer. Using low-sodium soy sauce adds flavor without unnecessary additional sodium. Recipe makes 2 servings at 2 eggs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 218; Total Fat: 16g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 9g; Cholesterol: 372mg; Sodium: 374mg; Carbohydrate: 3g; Dietary Fiber: 0g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 14g

2. BREAKFAST EGG CUP | HELLO GLOW

Eggs, bacon and vegetables offer everything you want in a meal without the hassle. Add the ingredients together in an oven-safe container, then bake while you get ready. Recipe makes 2 servings at 2 eggs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 244; Total Fat: 18g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 8g; Cholesterol: 377mg; Sodium: 374mg; Carbohydrate: 5g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 15g

3. CHEESY ZUCCHINI QUINOA EGG MUFFINS | SPOONFUL OF FLAVOR

This simple recipe can be prepped in advance and frozen for those moments when you don’t have time to cook. Recipe makes 10 servings at 1 muffin each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 70; Total Fat: 3g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 76mg; Sodium: 174mg; Carbohydrate: 6g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 6g

4. 5-MINUTE SALTY-SWEET BREAKFAST | IOWA GIRL EATS

Use the last of your summer peaches in this sweet-and-savory egg dish. Ready in 5 minutes and providing 6 grams of fiber and 12 grams of protein, this is an ideal post-workout meal. Recipe makes 1 serving at 1 egg each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 225; Total Fat: 8g; Saturated Fat: 2g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 179mg; Sodium: 287mg; Carbohydrate: 30g; Dietary Fiber: 6g; Sugar: 9g; Protein: 12g

5. SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH MATCHA AND LIME | A COUPLE COOKS

Matcha is making headlines as an energy-boosting superfood, so why not add it to your eggs? Its subtle flavor is brightened by a splash of lime for an easy scramble featuring 13 grams of protein. Recipe makes 4 servings at 2 eggs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 168; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 377mg; Sodium: 443mg; Carbohydrate: 3g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 13g

6. EGG WHITE SCRAMBLE | I FOOD REAL

Egg whites are a good way to increase your protein since more than half of the protein comes from the white. This scramble comes in at less than 150 calories per serving and packs a generous 17 grams of protein. Recipe makes 2 servings at 3 egg whites each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 127; Total Fat: 1g; Saturated Fat: g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 300mg; Carbohydrate: 11g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 5g; Protein: 17g

Source: My Fitness Pal
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Food & Nutrition recipes Uncategorized

🍰 8 No-Bake Desserts Under 300 Calories

8 No-Bake Desserts Under 300 Calories

As the weather cools down, that comfort food craving will start to slowly creep up — even for dessert. Stay within your goals with these no-bake treats and frozen desserts that are quick, easy-to-make and crowd pleasing — no oven necessary.

1. MANGO GREEN TEA POPS | MINIMALIST BAKER

Cool down with an antioxidant-packed sweet treat. Creamy and naturally sweetened, these two-toned popsicles are made with just five ingredients — mango, matcha powder, coconut milk, agave (or preferred sweetener) and lemon juice. Recipe makes 6 popsicles.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 93; Total Fat: 5g; Saturated Fat: 3.5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 16mg; Carbohydrate: 11g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 9g; Protein: 1g

2. STRAWBERRY CHEESECAKE PARFAITS | IVY MANNING

Creamy, yet light, these individual parfaits use the natural sweetness in strawberries to carry this dessert to deliciousness. It’s perfect for experimenting, too: use blueberries and vanilla yogurt or whatever combination strikes your fancy. Recipe makes 4 servings at 4 tablespoons yogurt mixture, 1/3 cup strawberries and 2 tablespoons cracker crumbs each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 185; Total Fat: 8g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 24mg; Sodium: 148mg; Carbohydrate: 23g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugar: 14g; Protein: 6g

3. DARK CHOCOLATE AVOCADO MOUSSE | HELLO GLOW

This decadent-tasting dessert satisfies even the most hard-core chocoholic. Creamy avocado and rich dark chocolate make this vegan mousse luscious but still healthy. Cocoa powder contains antioxidants while avocados are a good source of healthy monounsaturated fats. Recipe makes 4 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 80; Total Fat: 6g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 13mg; Carbohydrate: 7g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 2g; Protein: 1g

4. NO-BAKE STRAWBERRIES & CREAM CRÊPE CAKE | SKINNYTASTE

Impress family and friends with an elegant cake made of crepes. This fancy-looking cake is made by layering delicate crepes with a Greek yogurt cream filling and fresh strawberries. The crepes can be made ahead and assembled before serving. Recipe makes 12 servings at 1 slice each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 182; Total Fat: 9g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 3g; Cholesterol: 44mg; Sodium: 47mg; Carbohydrate: 22g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugar: 13g; Protein: 5g

5. HEALTHY OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE DOUGH “ICE CREAM” | EATING BIRD FOOD

For a healthy spin on cookie dough ice cream, whip up this tasty frozen treat. This vegan, gluten-free, five-ingredient recipe blends frozen bananas with oats, raisins, almond milk and cinnamon. Recipe makes 2 servings.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 213; Total Fat: 2g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 20mg; Carbohydrate: 51g; Dietary Fiber: 5g; Sugar: 26g; Protein: 4g

6. NO-BAKE LEMON PISTACHIO SHORTBREAD COOKIE BITES | COTTER CRUNCH

Bright and lemony, these cookie bites are vegan friendly and taste like shortbread cookies. Each bite is filled with pistachios, almond butter and a hint of honey. Recipe makes 25 servings at 1 cookie bite each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 77; Total Fat: 5g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 18mg; Carbohydrate: 8g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 4g; Protein: 2g

7. AVOCADO MINT FUDGE BARS | IFOODREAL

Get an extra dose of greens with these minty, sweet fudge bars. Made of creamy avocados, bananas, honey and crunchy cacao nibs, these naturally sweetened treats are full of healthy fats. Recipe makes 16 servings at 1 bar each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 136; Total Fat: 12g; Saturated Fat: 8g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 11mg; Carbohydrate: 7g; Dietary Fiber: 1g; Sugar: 5g; Protein: 0g

8. MINI COCONUT-BANANA CREAM PIES | 24 CARROT LIFE

These mini pies feature a quick, made-from-scratch crust filled with creamy bananas. These frozen pie bites have no added sugar and and even pack some protein. If you’re craving something sweet, these treats are perfect for any occasion. Recipe makes 4 servings at 1 mini pie each.

Nutrition (per serving): Calories: 258; Total Fat: 16g; Saturated Fat: 12g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 1mg; Sodium: 42mg; Carbohydrate: 21g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 12g; Protein: 9g

Source: MYFITNESSPAL’S RECIPES
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Food & Nutrition Motivation, Inspiration and Encouragement Uncategorized

Eat Like a Trainer: 8 Trainer-Approved Breakfast Recipes

by BRITTANY RISHER
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Eat Like a Trainer: 8 Trainer-Approved Breakfast Recipes

Talk to most trainers, and it seems they are up at the crack of dawn, work all day with clients, work out themselves, and then often have business, family, friends and personal matters to address. It’s a lot, and they check every item off their list with energy to spare.

What gives them that go-go-go pep? It turns out it’s combination of drive and the right foods, starting with a nutritious breakfast. We asked personal trainers to share the recipe for their go-to morning meals.

From eggs to oats to pancakes and the requisite smoothie, here are eight trainer-endorsed recipes to fuel your day — and your muscles.

EGGS OVER VEGGIE HASH
This breakfast, from Maria Macsay, a yoga teacher and instructor at 305 Fitness and SLT in New York City, puts bars and smoothies to shame. “I love this simple, yet nutritious, meal post-workout because it’s the perfect balance of protein, fiber, healthy fats and carbs, which supports repair of muscle tissue and replenishes the body’s energy supply. I always feel satiated, nourished and light after this meal,” she says.

Eggs-over-Veggie-Hash

Ingredients

  • Coconut oil
  • 4–5 sliced Brussels sprouts
  • Sliced fennel, as desired
  • 1/2 cup cooked sweet potato, cubed
  • 4 chopped kale leaves
  • Himalayan sea salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1–2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1–2 tablespoons nutritional yeast

Directions

Warm coconut oil in a pan over medium-high heat. Add Brussels sprouts and fennel and sauté for 5 minutes. Add sweet potato, kale and a pinch of salt. Continue to sauté until vegetables are soft and a fork easily pierces the sprouts.

In a separate pan, cook eggs over-easy or over-medium, based on your preference.

Plate vegetables. Top with olive oil, eggs and nutritional yeast. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 470; Total Fat: 23g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Monounsaturated Fat: 10g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 316mg; Carbohydrate: 36g; Dietary Fiber: 14g; Sugar: 5g; Protein: 27g

LOADED SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH AVOCADO & ROASTED POTATOES
Eggs are a classic breakfast, and who can say no to avocado? “I’m always on the move and start my mornings early, so my go-to healthy breakfast needs to be something quick and easy to whip up,” says Lita Lewis, founder of Thick Athletics Apparel and U by Kotex FITNESS partner. “This is one of my faves. What I love most about this recipe is how delicious it tastes. Not only does it fuel me with the energy I need to take on my day, it also leaves me feeling fully satisfied.” Lewis likes to serve her scramble with roasted potatoes (she makes them ahead of time so it’s just heat and eat) and half a fresh avocado.

Loaded-Scrambled-Eggs

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg white
  • Sea salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • 1 handful baby spinach
  • Spring onions, to taste
  • Cilantro, to taste
  • Halved cherry tomatoes, to taste
  • 1 dash paprika
  • Optional: roasted potatoes, avocado

Directions

Scramble eggs, egg whites and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl. Add to a frying pan with spinach, spring onions, cilantro and tomatoes. Cook to desired doneness. Serve topped with additional spring onions, cilantro and paprika. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 200; Total Fat: 10g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 251mg; Carbohydrate: 9g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 2g; Protein: 18g

OMELET “MUFFINS”
Take your omelet on the go by turning it into egg muffins, like these from the S.O.S. Food Plan by Ashley Borden, master trainer, lifestyle consultant and author. “I can easily eat these post-workout or, when I’m working early, just grab two and go,” she says. “The colorful veggies have antioxidants, and I usually top them with sliced avocado for more sustained energy and hot sauce.”

Omelet-Muffins

Ingredients

  • 8 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 8 ounces any lean meat
  • 2 cups chopped vegetables such as mushrooms, red bell peppers, broccoli, asparagus and/or onions
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 dash pepper
  • 1 dash garlic powder
  • 1 dash paprika

Directions

Preheat oven to 450°F and line a muffin pan with eight paper liners. Beat all ingredients together in a bowl. Divide among muffin cups and cook 18–20 minutes until set. Makes 4 servings at 2 muffins each.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 219; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 3g; Monounsaturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 405mg; Sodium: 348mg; Carbohydrate: 0g; Dietary Fiber: 0g; Sugar: 0g; Protein: 24g

ENERGY-BOOSTING BREAKFAST COMBO
Eggs or oatmeal? Why not both, says Instagram fitness star Anna Victoria. “My favorite homemade breakfast is a veggie omelet and berry cinnamon oatmeal,” she says. “It’s quick and easy to make, it gives you energy to start off your day on the right foot, and it’s a macro-balanced, whole-food meal.” Try finding that at a fast-food joint or coffee shop.

Energy-Boosting-Breakfast-Combo

Ingredients

Veggie Omelet

  • 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 dash of pink Himalayan salt
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 2–3 cherry tomatoes, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons bell peppers, chopped

Directions

Heat oil in a cooking pan over medium-low heat, tilting the pan to spread oil.  While the pan is heating, crack eggs and egg whites in a bowl and mix. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Add tomato and pepper to the pan and sauté or 1–2 minutes. Pour eggs into the pan and let sit for 1–2 minutes. Once it is nearly cooked, use a spatula to flip one side of the omelet onto the other side. Let cook for 1 additional minute.

Ingredients

Oatmeal

  • 1/3 cup oats
  • 3 tablespoons coconut milk
  • 1 handful mixed raspberries and blueberries
  • Cinnamon, to taste

Directions

Mix oats and coconut milk in a bowl. Heat in the microwave per package directions. Top with raspberries, blueberries and cinnamon.

Recipe makes 1 serving at one omelet and one bowl of oatmeal each.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 357; Total Fat: 15g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 3g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 473mg; Carbohydrate: 33g; Dietary Fiber: 5g; Sugar: 11g; Protein: 24g

BANANA PEANUT BUTTER OVERNIGHT OATS
Overnight oats are the solution for people who don’t want to do more than pour cereal and milk into a bowl in the morning. Simply combine all ingredients in a bowl the night before, pop in the fridge, and you can grab and eat in the morning. This recipe from Karena Dawn and Katrina Scott, cofounders of Tone It Up, is delicious, too. “Peanut butter and bananas … what’s not to love? Plus, the fiber in the oats helps slowly release glucose into your body for steady energy levels,” they say. Pack it in a mason jar so you can take it to the office if you’re in a rush.

Banana-PB-Overnight-Oats

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup rolled oats
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 4 teaspoons chia seeds
  • 2 teaspoons honey or maple syrup
  • 1 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 scoop vanilla Tone It Up Protein
  • 1 banana, sliced

Directions

Combine everything in a bowl. Divide among two mason jars. Let sit in the fridge overnight. Recipe makes 2 servings.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 352; Total Fat: 14g; Saturated Fat: 2g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 235mg; Carbohydrate: 45g; Dietary Fiber: 10g; Sugar: 14g; Protein: 17g

SIMPE APPLE PANCAKES
Pancakes are one of those recipes that seems like it takes a long time, but actually comes together quickly. Try these tasty, no-sugar-added flapjacks from Cassey Ho, creator of POP Pilates and POPFLEX. “I love this breakfast because it’s not only delicious, it’s packed with protein and complex carbs to keep me full and energized throughout the morning,” she says.

Apple-Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 tablespoons almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon nut butter
  • 1/2 small apple, spiraled or chopped
  • 1 pinch of cinnamon, optional

Directions

In a small bowl, whisk together eggs, applesauce, almond flour, coconut flour and baking powder. Heat a griddle or pan over medium-low heat and coat with cooking spray. Reduce to low heat. Using a small measuring cup, scoop batter to make two pancakes. Cook for 2–3 minutes per side, or until firm and cooked through. Top one pancake with nut butter and cinnamon, if using. Place the other pancake on top and add apples and more cinnamon. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 356; Total Fat: 19g; Saturated Fat: 6g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 226mg; Carbohydrate: 26g; Dietary Fiber: 9g; Sugar: 11g; Protein: 20g

GREEN SMOOTHIE
Green smoothies run the gamut, from sweet and fruity to grassy and kale-y. For those who prefer to mask the flavor of their greens, try this recipe from celebrity trainer, nutritionist and author Harley Pasternak. “It’s packed with protein and fiber, which helps make you full and stay full. Plus, if you’re not a huge fan of green veggies, it’s a delicious way to get in your greens without hardly tasting them,” he says.

Green-Smoothie

Ingredients

  • 2 cups spinach leaves, packed
  • 1 ripe pear, unpeeled, cored and chopped
  • 15 green or red grapes
  • 3/4 cup fat-free plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons chopped avocado
  • 1–2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 cup water, skim milk or almond milk (if needed to get the blender going)

Directions

In a blender, combine all ingredients and blend until smoothie reaches desired consistency. Recipe makes 1 serving.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 245; Total Fat: 3g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Monounsaturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 8mg; Sodium: 132mg; Carbohydrate: 39g; Dietary Fiber: 8g; Sugar: 24g; Protein: 20g

GLUTEN-FREE VEGAN PROTEIN PANCAKES 
ModelFIT trainer Rahel Ghebremichael turns to protein pancakes when she needs to fuel for a busy morning of teaching and training clients. “Teff is a small, gluten-free grain that I grew up on and recently started incorporating into my non-traditional foods,” she says. It has protein, fiber and iron to support your muscles.

Gluten-Free-Vegan-Protein-Pancakes

Ingredients

Dry

  • 1/2 cup teff flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon pink salt
  • 1/2 scoop chocolate protein powder

Wet

  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, divided
  • 2 teaspoons applesauce
  • 3/4 cups unsweetened almond milk

Directions

Mix the dry ingredients in a separate bowl and whisk several times.

Combine chia seeds and water and let sit for 2–3 minutes until a gel forms. Combine with 1 tablespoon coconut oil, applesauce and almond milk.

Mix wet and dry ingredients.

Set a pan over medium-high heat and grease with remaining tablespoon coconut oil. When hot, ladle in pancake mix to desired size and cook about 3–4 minutes, until pancake begins to bubble. Flip and cook another 3–4 minutes. Serve topped with maple syrup and fresh fruit as desired. Recipe makes 2 servings.

Nutrition (per serving)Calories: 300; Total Fat: 17g; Saturated Fat: 13g; Monounsaturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 15mg; Sodium: 357mg; Carbohydrate: 26g; Dietary Fiber: 7g; Sugar: 1g; Protein: 10g

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